Fossilised Dinosaur Faeces
Framed print available for $62.

Fossilised Dinosaur Faeces

Framed print available for $62.

Chilling a patient for hypothermix heart surgery.
Novosibirsk Institute, Russia, in 1979

Chilling a patient for hypothermix heart surgery.

Novosibirsk Institute, Russia, in 1979

The anatomy of a female spider.
Spiders have an alimentary canal (yellow), a blood vascular system (red), a breathing system (orange), a nervous system (blue), an excretion system (green), a reproduction system (white) and a set of glands for the production of silk (white at the rear).

The anatomy of a female spider.

Spiders have an alimentary canal (yellow), 
a blood vascular system (red), 
a breathing system (orange), 
a nervous system (blue), 
an excretion system (green), 
a reproduction system (white) and 
a set of glands for the production of silk (white at the rear).

Good words from a good dude, writing here as ASD Dad:

Today is World Autism Awareness Day, so here’s what I’ve learned about awareness over the past couple of years: my son with autism is very aware.
He’s aware of me, he’s aware of you. He’s aware of a lot more than he lets on.
He might appear distracted, aloof, in his own world; he might not answer when spoken to; he might chatter on seemingly oblivious to whether we’re listening or not.
But rest assured: he’s taking it in, this frenetic, loud world. If you get to know him, you’ll see the signs, hear the words that demonstrate this awareness.
And that’s another part of it: will you take his apparent lack of awareness as a sign that he doesn’t want to connect? Or will you take a moment to say hello, acknowledge his existence, even if it doesn’t come with an immediate payoff? Because, trust me: he’s aware of your efforts (and so are we).
So, for this Autism Awareness Day, I’d like to suggest we all assume awareness.

Good words from a good dude, writing here as ASD Dad:

Today is World Autism Awareness Day, so here’s what I’ve learned about awareness over the past couple of years: my son with autism is very aware.

He’s aware of me, he’s aware of you. He’s aware of a lot more than he lets on.

He might appear distracted, aloof, in his own world; he might not answer when spoken to; he might chatter on seemingly oblivious to whether we’re listening or not.

But rest assured: he’s taking it in, this frenetic, loud world. If you get to know him, you’ll see the signs, hear the words that demonstrate this awareness.

And that’s another part of it: will you take his apparent lack of awareness as a sign that he doesn’t want to connect? Or will you take a moment to say hello, acknowledge his existence, even if it doesn’t come with an immediate payoff? Because, trust me: he’s aware of your efforts (and so are we).

So, for this Autism Awareness Day, I’d like to suggest we all assume awareness.

map a way

A few days ago I said to Aaron, “2014 has been really shitty to a lot of people so far” and Aaron said, “That’s what you said last year.” We’ve had some good times, for sure, in the new 2014, but I still want more, and expect more, really. haven’t we earned some peace?

Aaron sent this Larry Levis poem to some friends of ours, who have had some shitty 2014 themselves. Aaron said it wasn’t comforting, but it is, because Levis is such a good writer and because he writes about our own stupid lives, we despite everything, we like our lives.

Doesn’t Aaron know so much? 

In the City of Light

The last thing my father did for me 
Was map a way: he died, & so 
Made death possible. If he could do it, I
Will also, someday, be so honored. Once,

At night, I walked through the lit streets
Of New York, from the Gramercy Park Hotel 
Up Lexington & at that hour, alone, 
I stopped hearing traffic, voices, the racket

Of spring wind lifting a newspaper high 
Above the lights. The streets wet, 
And shining. No sounds. Once,

When I saw my son be born, I thought
How loud this world must be to him, how final.

That night, out of respect for someone missing, 
I stopped listening to it.

Out of respect for someone missing, 
I have to say

This isn’t the whole story. 
The fact is, I was still in love.
My father died, & I was still in love. I know
It’s in bad taste to say it quite this way. Tell me, 
How would you say it?

The story goes: wanting to be alone & wanting
The easy loneliness of travelers,

I said good-bye in an airport & flew west. 
It happened otherwise.
And where I’d held her close to me, 
My skin felt raw, & flayed. 

Descending, I looked down at light lacquering fields
Of pale vines, & small towns, each 
With a water tower; then the shadows of wings; 
Then nothing.

My only advice is not to go away. 
Or, go away. Most

Of my decisions have been wrong.

When I wake, I lift cold water 
To my face. I close my eyes.

A body wishes to be held, & held, & what
Can you do about that?

Because there are faces I might never see again, 
There are two things I want to remember
About light, & what it does to us.

Her bright, green eyes at an airport—how they widened 
As if in disbelief; 
And my father opening the gate: a lit, & silent

City.

Seasons - Future Islands on Letterman

"Ladies and gentleman…I’ll take all you got of that!"

At 14 weeks of gestation, twins were seen reaching for each other. By 18 weeks, they touched each other more often than they touched their own bodies. The researchers said that kinematic analyses of the recordings revealed that the twins made distinct gestures toward each other and were as gentle to the other twin’s delicate eye area as they were when they touched their own. — Huffington Post

At 14 weeks of gestation, twins were seen reaching for each other. By 18 weeks, they touched each other more often than they touched their own bodies. The researchers said that kinematic analyses of the recordings revealed that the twins made distinct gestures toward each other and were as gentle to the other twin’s delicate eye area as they were when they touched their own. — Huffington Post

(Source: gifovea)

In our first round of ten postcards we had five images and five messages. They have been mixed and matched among you. Look for thoughts on a pretzel fight, a popular hare, confident teenagers, a blank postcard, Cormac McCarthy, and grass.

Deborah Luster: L.C.I.W. 83. Louisiana, 1999.
At the end of the 1990s, photographer Deborah Luster spent 3-1/2 years taking formal photos of inmates at the women’s prison in St. Gabriel, the minimum security male prison in Transylvania, and the Angola maximum security prison.
Most of the inmates posed themselves. Sometimes the prisoners would hold something, like a box of valentine candy or a shoe. Some photos of the Mardi Gras celebration, and some, like this one, from the Halloween haunted house in St. Gabriel — all these traditional Louisiana costumes and archetypes, like Alligator Girl, Rat Face.
I heard this last night on the NPR show THE HIDDEN LIFE OF GIRLS, which helped sooth my rattled one-hour-before-close Ikea trip.
There’s a book and I’m going to buy it.
dianalily:

Deborah Luster: L.C.I.W. 83. Louisiana, 1999.

Deborah Luster: L.C.I.W. 83. Louisiana, 1999.

At the end of the 1990s, photographer Deborah Luster spent 3-1/2 years taking formal photos of inmates at the women’s prison in St. Gabriel, the minimum security male prison in Transylvania, and the Angola maximum security prison.

Most of the inmates posed themselves. Sometimes the prisoners would hold something, like a box of valentine candy or a shoe. Some photos of the Mardi Gras celebration, and some, like this one, from the Halloween haunted house in St. Gabriel — all these traditional Louisiana costumes and archetypes, like Alligator Girl, Rat Face.

I heard this last night on the NPR show THE HIDDEN LIFE OF GIRLS, which helped sooth my rattled one-hour-before-close Ikea trip.

There’s a book and I’m going to buy it.

dianalily:

Deborah Luster: L.C.I.W. 83. Louisiana, 1999.

The “Tonight you Belong to Me” scene in The Jerk.

"The Treatments Didn’t Work"


Fellow twin parents Lyndsey and Emily, whose twin boys were born in Brooklyn, found out a year ago that their son Mac (16 months old at the time) had cancer. Some twin moms did a fundraiser when Mac was first diagnosed, and they were amazed by the generosity of strangers.

Thanks to those who gave, the family has been able to meet unforeseen expenses such as travel costs, medical copays, and full-time childcare for Mac’s twin brother. They have bravely battled Mac’s disease, trying chemo, radiation, and clinical trials. They have also been split apart, with Emily working and the Lyndsey often in the hospital with Mac.

Unfortunately, Mac’s disease was resistant to all treatments, and they are out of options. The disease is taking over Mac’s body. In order to spend Mac’s last weeks together as a family, Emily must take unpaid leave from her job, making their financial situation difficult once again.

Please consider donating and sharing with your friends, so that this family can be together while facing the most unbearable loss a parent can face.  As a friend says,

"To lose a child is the worst thing a parent can face. To find yourself bankrupt when it’s all over is just bullsh*t. Sadly, that is what happens to a lot of cancer families." 

Go to this page to donate: https://www.youcaring.com/macalister

On September 1, 1914, Martha, the last known Passenger Pigeon, died in the Cincinnati Zoo. Her body was frozen into a block of ice and sent to the Smithsonian Institution, where it was skinned, dissected, photographed and mounted. Currently, Martha is in the museum’s archived collection and not on display. A memorial statue of Martha stands on the grounds of the Cincinnati Zoo

On September 1, 1914, Martha, the last known Passenger Pigeon, died in the Cincinnati Zoo. Her body was frozen into a block of ice and sent to the Smithsonian Institution, where it was skinned, dissected, photographed and mounted. Currently, Martha is in the museum’s archived collection and not on display. A memorial statue of Martha stands on the grounds of the Cincinnati Zoo

something sandpapery by Amie Dicke

something sandpapery by Amie Dicke

My mom spent her Friday afternoon matching Monets and Renoirs and a Cassatt and a Calder to photos of the girls.

My mom spent her Friday afternoon matching Monets and Renoirs and a Cassatt and a Calder to photos of the girls.

WHAT SNOW REVEALS ABOUT STREETS
Walking through the slush these past few weeks, you may have spotted a pattern: a tire-marked path through the snow surrounded by untouched white.

The phenomenon was first branded a “sneckdown” by Transportation Alternative activists in 2001. It’s a neckdown of untrod or plow-piled snow—a neckdown is when the width of a street at an intersection is made narrower to calm traffic.)
Drive-lines provide a clear message about how streets can work better. The prospect of wider sidewalks, new public plazas and bike lanes are revealed in the space where no one has driven.

WHAT SNOW REVEALS ABOUT STREETS

Walking through the slush these past few weeks, you may have spotted a pattern: a tire-marked path through the snow surrounded by untouched white.


The phenomenon was first branded a “sneckdown” by Transportation Alternative activists in 2001. It’s a neckdown of untrod or plow-piled snow—a neckdown is when the width of a street at an intersection is made narrower to calm traffic.)


Drive-lines provide a clear message about how streets can work better. The prospect of wider sidewalks, new public plazas and bike lanes are revealed in the space where no one has driven.